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Honors Foundations Courses

Honors Foundations Courses are special topics courses that are listed under course number “shells” that are keyed to specific GEF requirements. The Honors College is currently developing the following courses, which are in Faculty Senate committees now:

Each course will serve as the shell for course topics that are proposed under the auspices of the Honors Faculty Fellows program. Sections will typically be capped at 25 students.  Each accepted Honors Foundations Course will then be offered once in each semester in an academic year and will rotate to an innovative new subject in the next academic year.


Honors Foundations Course Outcomes

HONR 202: Honors Science and Technology

Students in these courses will:

HONR 203: Honors Mathematics and Quantitative skill

Students in these courses will:
  • Make connections between mathematics and quantitative skills and today’s world.
  • Employ intellectual and practical skills of quantitative techniques and practical application of numerical, symbolic, or spatial concepts in a way that is relevant to modern life. 
  • Exercise both personal or social responsibility through the careful and rigorous application of quantitative literacy to numerical aspects of daily life, and by applying critical reasoning to data for use in education, the workplace, and nearly every field of human endeavor.
  • Integrate and synthesize knowledge gleaned from quantitative literacy across disciplines including, but not limited to, the natural and applied sciences and social sciences. 
  • Make connections between mathematics and quantitative skills and today’s world.
    • Critical LEAP Goal 2: quantitative literacy


HONR 204 – Honors Society and Connections

Students in these courses will:

  • Make connections between the human behavior, social and political organization, communication, and today’s world.
  • Employ intellectual and practical skills of employing social, political, and economic systems in a way that is relevant to modern life. 
  • Exercise personal or social responsibility through the application of civic knowledge and practice of civic engagement, and by discussing individual, societal, and global situations and problems.
  • Integrate and synthesize knowledge of human behavior and society across disciplines including, but not limited to, the social sciences.
    • Critical LEAP Goal 3:  civic knowledge and engagement


HONR 205—Honors Human Inquiry & the Past

Students in these courses will:

  • Make connections between the humanistic practices of philosophical, spiritual, and historical inquiry and today’s world.
  • Employ intellectual and practical skills of researching and analyzing ideas, texts, practices, and artifacts of the recent and distant past in a way that is relevant to modern life. 
  • Exercise both personal or social responsibility through inquiry into the ideas, texts, practices, and artifacts of the recent and distant past, and by applying the results of that inquiry to personal, local, national, and/or international situations and problems.
  • Integrate and synthesize knowledge gleaned from philosophical, spiritual, and historical inquiry across disciplines including, but not limited to, the traditional humanities.
    • Critical LEAP Goal 2: inquiry and analysis


HONR 206—Honors Arts and Creativity

Students in these courses will:

  • Make connections between the arts—through analysis and/or practice—and today’s world.
  • Employ intellectual and practical skills of analyzing and/or producing artwork in a way that is relevant to modern life. 
  • Exercise both personal or social responsibility through the analysis and practice of art, and by discussing personal, local, national, and/or international situations and problems.
  • Integrate and synthesize knowledge of artistic expression across disciplines including, but not limited to, the arts and humanities.
    • Critical LEAP Goal 2: critical and creative thinking


HONR 207—Honors Global Studies and Diversity

Students in these courses will:

  • Make connections between diverse cultures, groups of people, and experiences and the ways that diversity affects today’s world.
  • Employ intellectual and practical skills of analyzing global culture and other modes of diversity in a way that is relevant to modern life. 
  • Exercise both personal and social responsibility by engaging other ways of life, experiences, means of expression, histories, and modes of being and by putting those into conversation with personal, local, national, and/or international situations and problems.
  • Integrate and synthesize knowledge of global cultures and diverse experiences across disciplines including the arts, humanities, and social sciences. 
    • Critical LEAP Goal 3: intercultural knowledge and competence

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