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Fall 2021 Honors Course List

Visit this page for information on selecting your Honors course for fall semester, including how to see all available Honors courses in STAR, as well as course descriptions for select Honors courses. 

Check the Registrar's website for information on your priority registration date. 

This page will be updated as information becomes available on course changes and new course offerings.

If none of the listed courses will work with your schedule next semester, remember there are other ways to earn Honors credit. Please contact your Honors advisor with any questions. 

How to Find Honors Courses in STAR

Want to see most available Honors courses for Fall 2021 in one place? Follow the instructions below.  

  1. Go to star.wvu.edu and log in with your WVU ID and password. 
  2. Select "Student Services & Housing."
  3. Select "Registration."
  4. Select "Browse Classes."
  5. Select "Fall 2021."
  6. Do not select a subject. This will keep all subjects selected.
  7. Under "Campus," select "WVU Campus Course."
  8. Under "Attribute," select "Honors Course."
  9. Click "Search." You should now see the current list of Honors courses for the spring semester. 

Fall 2021 Course List

**Please note: some of the courses listed below have both Honors sections AND non-Honors sections available. Be careful while building your schedule to select the Honors section in order to earn Honors credit for the course. If you aren't sure whether a course counts for Honors credit, contact your advisor and the Honors College (honors@mail.wvu.edu).**

Honors College Faculty Fellows Courses

These special topics courses will be taught in the 2021-2022 academic year, with an additional course available Spring 2022 (Principles of Conservation Ecology Honors Add-on, Amy Welsh, Wildlife & Fisheries, Davis College). See the full list of Honors Faculty Fellows and their courses here.

Materials for the Future

HONR 202A, H02 (CRN: 87427)

John Craynon

Engineering Sciences Building | Room 501 | 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM MWF

“Materials for the Future” will charge students with examining the challenges of meeting today’s needs for raw materials and energy while also taking into account geopolitical issues and growing concerns of global climate change. Students will hear from experts in a variety of fields and gain an understanding of how data and knowledge from science, engineering, economics, social sciences and other disciplines can be used together in decision making. How do we balance our societal needs for these materials with the impact attaining them has on our quality of life? What are the ecological, economic, political and social costs to acquiring these materials and energy?



The Road to Inequality

HONR 204A, H02 (CRN: 87428)

Stefanie Hines

Percival Hall | Room 314A | 03:30 PM - 04:45 PM TTh

“The Road to Inequality” will examine the history of systemic racism in land ownership and property rights in the United States, from conflicts between early settlers and Native Americans to today. Re-examining long-held ideas about the American dream, housing, land rights and racial discrimination, students will conduct their own hands-on research through historical records, policy and data. State-of-the-art software and interactions with community members and local politicians will help bring to life the landscape of inequity and factors that created the massive divide in land ownership that continues today.



Arthurdale, WV Matters

HONR 204B, H02 (CRN:87429)

Renée K. Nicholson, Ann Pancake, Michael Walsh

Oglebay Hall | Room 110 | 04:00 PM - 05:15 PM TTh

“Arthurdale, WV Matters” teaches students how to connect with historical sites and the non-profit organizations and people who run them. Combining business and marketing with public humanities, students will develop skills in promoting and preserving sites of cultural and historical importance. Focusing on Arthurdale, students in this team-taught course will explore Arthurdale’s history from the New Deal to the present day, examine problematic aspects of the site related to class and race, interact with Arthurdale craftspeople, learn about issues facing Appalachia and rural communities, and gain the tools to help sustain sites of significance. Students will also reflect on heritage, traditions and history and their relevance to civic and cultural life today.



Dangerous Music

HONR 206A, H02 (CRN: 87430)

Jennifer Walker

CPASS Building | Room 103 | 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM TTh

In “Dangerous Music,” students will explore the ways music and danger have become intertwined and, in some cases, inseparable. Focusing on select themes throughout history, this course will draw on studies in fields of political science, religious history, gender studies, sociology and music. Dangerous music can be found throughout historical periods, musical styles and global cultures. It has at points been seen as a seductive peril, a threat against society and culture, and even been used as an instrument of punishment and torture. Students will ask how “dangerous” music is perceived in terms of gender, sexuality, race and politics. Who has considered music to be dangerous and why? How in history has music been seen as a threat to established norms? What are our responsibilities as consumers? Students will create micro-podcasts exploring the themes of the course throughout the semester.



Extractive Capitalism

HONR 207A, H02 (CRN: 87431)

Devin Smart

Woodburn Hall | Room G11 | 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM TTh

“Extractive Capitalism” will use the concept of extractivism to investigate the changing relationship between the economy and the natural world since the start of the Industrial Revolution. Extractivism refers to the ways that modern economies drive the mass extraction of natural resources, and students will study the political, socio-economic and environmental consequences of this process. Specifically, the course will examine fossil fuels and the worlds they have created, starting with how coal formed the basis of post-1800 industrial societies. Then, students will move to the petroleum age, considering how this new form of energy transformed the world. Along the way, students will learn about other extractive industries, as well as global inequalities shaped by colonialism, decolonization and the role of power in the world economy. The course concludes with a focus on extractivism and more recent globalization, and their connection to climate change.

Full List of Honors Courses


Principles of Accounting 2

ACCT 202

Barbara Apostolou

Business & Economics Building | Room 440 | 01:30pm - 02:20pm MWF

This course introduces financial accounting concepts and reporting with an emphasis on measuring, recording and reporting transactions for business entities.

 

UG Research Experience 1 (Agricultural Biochemistry 386)

AGBI 386

Kimberly Barnes

PR: At least sophomore standing and faculty permission. Students will write a research proposal, conduct supervised research, and write a progress report. This course is the first of a two-course sequence that leads to a research-based capstone experience. Students must also complete AGBI 486 for this to serve as the Biochemistry Capstone course.

 

Research Agriculture Biochemistry 497

AGBI 497

Kimberly Barnes

Independent research projects.

 

Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 105

Susanna Donaldson

Lyon Tower | Room G07 | 02:00pm - 02:50pm MWF

Essentials of human evolution and prehistory with a concentration on the varieties of languages and cultures found among peoples of the world.

 

Drawing 1

ART 111

Patrick Jones

Creative Arts Center | Room 5007 | 09:00am - 11:50am MW

 

Survey of Art History 1

ARHS 120

Megan Leight

Creative Arts Center | Room 2140 | 09:30am - 10:45am TTH

 

Survey of Art History 2

ARHS 160

Rhonda Reymond

CPASS Building | Room G10 | 11:00am - 12:15pm TTH

The course examines the history of the visual arts in world cultures from the fourteenth century to the present.

 

Independent Study (Art History)

ARHS 495

Kristina Olson

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

 

Inquiry Approaches to Teaching

ARSC 120

Joshua Karr

Allen Hall | Room 809 | 10:00am - 10:50am W

Introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, offering opportunity to explore teaching as a career. Students obtain firsthand experience in designing, planning, and teaching lessons in local elementary and middle school classrooms, and is assessing students' progress toward course objectives

 

Inquiry Approaches to Teaching

ARSC 120

Elaine Schwing

Agricultural Sciences Building | Room 2010 | 09:00am - 09:50am T

Introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, offering opportunity to explore teaching as a career. Students obtain firsthand experience in designing, planning, and teaching lessons in local elementary and middle school classrooms and is assessing students' progress toward course objectives.

 

Inquiry Approaches to Teaching

ARSC 120

Elaine Schwing

Allen Hall | Room 711 | 02:00pm - 02:50pm TH

Introduction to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, offering opportunity to explore teaching as a career. Students obtain firsthand experience in designing, planning, and teaching lessons in local elementary and middle school classrooms and is assessing students' progress toward course objectives.

 

Inquiry-Based Lesson Design

ARSC 220

Michael Tilley

Agricultural Sciences Building | Room 2010 | 09:30am - 10:45am TH

PR: ARSC 120. Builds on the lesson-planning skills developed in ARSC 120, focusing on characteristics of excellent mathematics and science curricula, aligning instruction with state and district standards, and the appropriate use of pre- and post-assessments. Students continue exploring teaching as a career through planning and implementing three mathematics or science lessons in local middle school classrooms.


Inquiry-Based Lesson Design

ARSC 220

Michael Tilley

Allen Hall | Room 809 | 02:00pm - 03:15pm W

PR: ARSC 120. Builds on the lesson-planning skills developed in ARSC 120, focusing on characteristics of excellent mathematics and science curricula, aligning instruction with state and district standards, and the appropriate use of pre- and post-assessments. Students continue exploring teaching as a career through planning and implementing three mathematics or science lessons in local middle school classrooms.

 

Descriptive Astronomy

ASTR 106

Kathryn Williamson

White Hall | Room B51 | 02:30pm - 03:45pm TTH

 

Descriptive Astronomy Lab

ASTR 107

White Hall | Room 103 | 02:30pm - 04:20pm F

 

Human Sexuality

BIOL 122

Toni Morris

Health Sciences North | Room 2118 | 01:00pm - 02:20pm TTH

A study of biological, behavioral and societal aspects of sexuality. Issues considered include changing fecundity, social-legal implications, sex roles, sexually transmitted diseases, populations, erotica, aging, dysfunctions, and decision- making skills for sex related issues.

 

Human Sexuality

BIOL 122

Toni Morris

Chitwood Hall | Room G5 | 10:00am - 11:15am TTH

A study of biological, behavioral and societal aspects of sexuality. Issues considered include changing fecundity, social-legal implications, sex roles, sexually transmitted diseases, populations, erotica, aging, dysfunctions, and decision- making skills for sex related issues.

 

Biology 101 Add-On

BIOL 298A

Sydha Salihu

Life Sciences Building | Room 4001 | 01:30pm - 02:20pm M

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Biology 102 Add-On

BIOL 298B

Elizabeth Thomas

Life Sciences Building | Room 5001 | 01:30pm - 02:20pm M

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

 

Biology 115 Add-On

BIOL 298C

Stephanie Young

Life Sciences Building | Room 3303 | 10:30am - 11:20am M

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Biology 115 Add-On

BIOL 298C

Stephanie Young

Life Sciences Building | Room 3303 | 11:30am - 12:20pm M

 PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Biology 115 Add-On

BIOL 298C

Stephanie Young

Life Sciences Building | Room 3303 | 10:00am - 10:50am T

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Biology 115 Add-On

BIOL 298C

Stephanie Young

Life Sciences Building | Room 3303 | 11:30am - 12:20pm W

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Biology 115 Add-On

BIOL 298C

Stephanie Young

Life Sciences Building | Room 3303 | 10:00am - 10:50am TH

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

 

 

Biology 219 Add-On

BIOL 298E

Jessica Towey & Dana Huebert-Lima

Life Sciences Building | Room 3311 | 11:30am - 12:20pm W

In this course, students will explore controversial topics in biology that are often misunderstood by those outside the scientific community. We will use lectures and readings to understand these topics on a cellular/molecular level. We will also use discussions to understand typical misconceptions we hear in the media, see on social media platforms, or hear in everyday discussion. The second half of the semester will be spent combating these misconceptions by creating public outreach products, using blogs, podcasts, or videos on a social media platform.

 

Biology 219 Add-On

BIOL 298E

Jessica Towey & Dana Huebert-Lima

Life Sciences Building | Room 3311 | 11:30am - 12:20pm F

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent of the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Honors Investigation & Thesis

BIOL 486

Susan Raylman

PR: Second semester of junior year, recommendation of advisor, biology majors only. Permission required. Supervised readings, investigation, and study.

 

Teaching Practicum

BIOL 490 (Sections H01 & H02)

John Navaratnam

 

Teaching Practicum

BIOL 490

Stephanie Young

 

Teaching Practicum

BIOL 490

Amaris Guardiola

 

First-Year Seminar

BCOR 191

Li Wang

Business & Economics Building | Room 458 | 08:30am - 09:20am W

Engages students in active learning strategies that enable effective transition to college life at WVU. Students will explore school, college and university programs, policies and services relevant to academic success. Provides active learning activities that enable effective transition to the academic environment. Students examine school, college and university programs, policies and services.

 

Introduction to Business

BCOR 199

Li Wang

Business & Economics Building | Room 441 | 09:30am - 10:20am MWF

Honors students participating in Mountaineer Quest should register for this section.

 

Introduction to Business

BCOR 199

Li Wang

Business & Economics Building | Room 441 | 10:30am - 11:20am MWF

 

Introduction to Business

BCOR 199

Li Wang

Business & Economics Building | Room 441 | 11:30am - 12:20pm MWF

 

Principles of Marketing

BCOR 350

Margaret Fitzgerald

Hodges Hall | Room 106 | 01:30pm - 03:20pm MWF

Overview of marketing and the interrelationships between marketing and other business disciplines. Topics include the management of the product, communication, price, and distribution variables as well as introduction to buyer behavior and marketing research.

 

Organic Chemistry

CHEM 233

Jessica Hoover

Clark Hall | Room 317 | 10:30am - 11:20am MWF, 11:30am - 12:20pm W

PR: (CHEM 116 or CHEM 118) and PR or CONC: CHEM 235 with a minimum grade of C- in all. Basic principles of organic chemistry. Modern structural concepts, the effect of structure on physical and chemical properties, reactions and their mechanisms and application to syntheses. (3 hr. lec.) (Students may not receive credit for CHEM 233, CHEM 234, and for CHEM 231.)

 

Families Across the Life Span

CDFS 110

Amy Root

Percival Hall | Room 334 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

Explores the physical, psychological, and cognitive developmental changes of individuals who are functioning in family systems that change across the life-span.

 

 

File and Data Structures

CS 210

Ronald Reaser

Online Course | 09:00am - 09:50am MWF, 10:00am - 11:50am F

PR: CS 111 with a minimum grade of C- or consent for non-majors. Complex internal data structures including hashing, record collision and overflow techniques. Extension of internal data structures to external storage; indexed structures, external sorting and merging, direct access methods.

 

Analysis of Algorithms

CS 320

Elaine Eschen & Paul Maclean

Advanced Engineering Research | Room 135 | 02:00pm - 02:50pm MWF

PR: WVU sections require CS 111 and CS 220 and MATH 156 with a minimum grade of C- in each, WVUIT sections require CS 201 and CS 220 and MATH 156 with a minimum grade of C- in each. Introduction to algorithm design and analysis. Growth rate of functions and asymptotic notation. Divide-and-conquer algorithms and recurrences; searching and sorting; graph algorithms including graph searching, minimum spanning trees, and shortest paths.

 

Compiler Construction

CS 410

Frances Vanscoy & Levi Butcher

Advanced Engineering Research | Room 137 | 11:00am - 12:15pm TTH

PR: WVU sections require CS 310 with a C- or better or consent for non-majors, WVUIT sections require CS 310 or consent for non-majors. Theory and practice of the construction of programming language translators; scanning and parsing techniques, semantic processing, runtime storage organization, and code generation; design and implementation of interpreter or compiler by students. (3 hr. lec.)

 

Life Choices

COUN 230

Heidi OToole & Christine Schimmel

Chitwood Hall | Room G1 | 10:00am - 11:15am TTH

Students will examine lifestyle choices typically dictated by unconscious customs rather than research. Covers areas of attitude, relationships, physical lifestyle, health and spirituality. The class consists of lectures and required student participation.

 

Introduction to Addition Studies

COUN 240

Kathleen Chiasson, Christine Schimmel, & Frances Tack

Allen Hall | Room 610 | 05:00pm - 07:50pm T

Overview of core concepts related to substance use and substance use disorders. Topics include the history of drug use/addiction, effects on societal members, pharmacology of common psychoactive drugs, theories of addiction, treatment approaches, mutual support, recovery and relapse.

 

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 201

Daniel Grossman, Cathleen Johnson, & Tynetta Johnson

Business & Economics Building | Room 441 | 11:30am - 12:45pm TTH

Introductory microeconomics analysis. Competitive behavior of firms, price determination, efficiency in production and equity in distribution. Pre-requisite(s) and/or co-requisite(s) may differ on regional campuses.

 

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 202

Arabinda Basistha, Tynetta Johnson, & Scott Schuh

Business & Economics Building | Room 440 | 01:00pm - 02:15pm TTH

PR: ECON 201 or ARE 150. Introductory macroeconomics analysis, prerequisites are not enforced at WVUIT and Potomac State campuses. Aggregate demand and supply, saving, investment, the level of employment and national income determination, monetary and fiscal policy.

 

Principles-Energy Land Management

ENLM 200

Shawn Gruschecky & Madison Sterne

Percival Hall | Room 335 } 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

The science of energy land management with an emphasis on petroleum, natural gas, coal, solar, wind, hydropower, and biomass energy production. Complexities of energy systems and how surface and mineral management techniques compare and/or contrast to those found in traditional energy systems.

 

Engineering Problem Solving 1

ENGR 101

Martin Dunlap, Susie Huggins, Lizzie Santiago, Robin Hensel, & Sumaia Ali Raisa

Online Course

PR or CONC: MATH 154 or MATH 155. Engineering problem solving methodologies and analysis. Use of computers in problem solving, technical report writing, team based project work and presentations.

 

Engineering Problem Solving 1

ENGR 101

Martin Dunlap, Susie Huggins, Lizzie Santiago, Robin Hensel, & Sumaia Ali Raisa

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G11 | 12:00pm - 12:50pm MW

This section is open only to students in the Honors College. Freshmen registering for this course should also register for: CRN 88204 ENGR 191 Section 009, F 12-12:50 ESB G3

 

Engineering Problem Solving 1

ENGR 101

Martin Dunlap, Susie Huggins, Lizzie Santiago, Robin Hensel, & Sumaia Ali Raisa

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G11 | 08:00am - 08:50am MW

This section is open only to students in the Honors College. Freshmen registering for this course should also register for: CRN 89103 ENGR 191 Section 19, F 8-8:50 ESB G3

 

Engineering Problem Solving 1

ENGR 101

Martin Dunlap, Susie Huggins, Lizzie Santiago, Robin Hensel, & Sumaia Ali Raisa

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G11 | 01:00pm - 01:50pm MW

The section is open only to students in the Honors College. Freshmen registering for this course should also register for: CRN 88211 ENGR 191 Section 013, F 1-1:50 ESB G11

 

Engineering Problem Solving 1

ENGR 101

Michael Brewster, Martin Dunlap, Susie Huggins, Lizzie Santiago, Robin Hensel, & Sumaia Ali Raisa

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G11 | 04:00pm - 04:50pm MW

Freshmen registering for this course should also register for: CRN 88208 ENGR 191, Section 010, G-78B OR 88210 ENGR 191, Section 012, G-11

 

Engineering Problem Solving 2

ENGR 102

Robin Hensell & Susie Huggins

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G78B | 03:30pm - 04:45pm TTH

 

Literature of Minds and Selves

ENGL 170

Gwen Bergner

Woodburn Hall | Room G16 | 01:00pm - 02:15pm TTH

This course explores the nature of consciousness, selfhood, and humanness through literary and filmic representations of thought and character, especially those that deviate from the norm. Topics will vary by semester and might include disability, trauma, monstrosity, criminality, human rights, queer characters, children's literature, posthumanism, or animal studies, among others.

 

Foundations of Literary Study

ENGL 200

Christine Hoffmann

Hodges Hall | Room 210 | 04:00pm - 05:15pm TTH

Study and practice of the analytical, research, and writing skills fundamental to literary studies.

 

 

Contemporary Literature

ENGL 273

Kathleen Ryan

Woodburn Hall | Room 106 | 09:30am - 10:20am MWF

An examination of the literature written since 1960 in England and America. Poetry, drama, and fiction. Selections will vary depending on the instructor.

 

Justice and Literature

ENGL 275

Kathleen Ryan

Woodburn Hall | Room 106 | 11:30am - 12:20pm MWF

An exploration of the concept and practice of justice through a study of literature. Literary works draw from history, theology, philosophy, and legal cases to illustrate the complexity of justice. How has literature reflected and produced understandings of justice? Time period and regional, national, or global focus will vary by instructor.

 

Literature of 18th Century 1

ENGL 366

Marilyn Francus

Hodges Hall | Room 210 | 01:00pm - 02:15pm TTH

Literature of the period 1660-1744 in relation to social, political, and religious movements of the time.

 

Victorian Literature

ENGL 369

John Lamb

Woodburn Hall | Room 110 | 10:00am - 11:15am TTH

Study of Victorian poets and prose writers with an emphasis on historical, political, and cultural issues. Representative authors may include: Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, and Hardy.

 

Fashion Sourcing and SCM

FDM 412

Debanjan Das

Percival Hall | Room 316 | 03:30pm - 04:45pm TTH

PR or CONC: FDM 360 with a minimum grade of C-. This course evaluates key issues facing fashion businesses in the global marketplace. It includes an examination of internal and external forces affecting political, economic, social, environmental and ethical production, and distribution of textile and apparel products.

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainability in Fashion

FDM 460

Kathryn Jones

Online Course

PR: FDM 211 with a minimum grade of C- and PR or CONC: FDM 360 with a minimum grade of C- or consent. This course examines sustainability in the context of cultural, economic, environmental, social, and technological policies and procedures of fashion industries. Factors analyzed include ethics, government policies, international labor standards, environmental regulations, company priorities, consumer responsibilities, economic impact, and worker rights.

 

Omni-Channel Fashion Retailing

FDM 461

Debanjan Das

Agricultural Sciences Building | Room 2004 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

PR: FDM 211 or FDM 360 with a minimum grade of C- or consent. This course provides an overview of various channels of fashion retail distribution including catalogs, e-commerce, broadcast and brick & mortar formats. It will examine the principles and strategies applied by fashion retailers that market goods and/or services using an omni-channel retail business model.

 

HNRS: FCLT 340 Add-On

FCLT 298A

Annastella Vester

Online Course

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

 

HNRS: FCLT 250 Add-On

FCLT 298C

Lisa DiBartolomeo

PR: Student in the Honors Program and consent from the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

HNRS: FCLT 381 Add-On

FCLT 498G

Lisa DiBartolomeo

PR: Student in the Honors Program and consent from the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Francophone Literature-Transit

FLIT 239

Jancie Spleth

Hodges Hall | Room 112 | 07:00pm - 08:15pm MW

Works by French-speaking authors from Africa and the Caribbean. French majors will read selections in the original.

 

Research

FIS 497

Jacqueline Speir

 

Climate and Sustainability

GEOG 205

Brendan McNeil

Brooks Hall | Room G25 | 10:00am - 11:15am TTH

Examines the sustainability of natural resources in the context of global climate change. Emphasis is on the sustainability of food, water, energy, and other resources in the United States within the context of the global environment.

 

SPTP: Paleoecology

Geology 493A

James Lamsdell

Brooks Hall | Room 412 | 01:30pm - 02:45pm TTH

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

 

Global Campus Read

GLO 293A

Vanessa Yerkovich

Online

Global Campus Read is a global group read of the WVU Campus Read, to be announced. It includes online visiting students from WVU’s international exchange partner institutions. Launched in 2020-2021, we had an even split of WVU and exchange students for Fall and Spring.

 

Intro to Global Competency

GLO 101

Shelby Concepcion

Central concepts of global awareness, intercultural communication, and global issues. Intended as part of the Global Mountaineers Certificate in global competency, and to help prepare students for experiences in education, work, or service abroad, as well as for successful integration into the global community. Provides insight, information, and a starting point for further research and study.

 

Honors Hall Council

HONR 101

Keisha Kibler & Jeremiah Kibler

Honors Hall | Room 120 | 07:00pm - 07:50pm W

An introduction to the process of planning and implementing community activities. Students produce a proposal, complete with a budget for an activity, which is evaluated by their peers. Students read and discuss articles on Leadership that frame their performance and interactions in an academic context. Honors Hall students only.

 

Honors Hall Council

HONR 101

Keisha Kibler & Jeremiah Kibler

Lincoln Hall | Room 139 | 07:00pm - 07:50pm T

An introduction to the process of planning and implementing community activities. Students produce a proposal, complete with a budget for an activity, which is evaluated by their peers. Students read and discuss articles on Leadership that frame their performance and interactions in an academic context. Lincoln Hall students only.

 

 

 

 

First-Year Seminar

HONR 191

Ashley Watts

Online Course | 02:30pm - 03:20pm MW

Engages students in active learning strategies that enable effective transition to college life at WVU. Students will explore school, college and university programs, policies and services relevant to academic success. Provides active learning activities that enable effective transition to the academic environment. Students examine school, college and university programs, policies and services.

 

Materials for the Future

HONR 202A

John Craynon

Engineering Sciences Building | Room 501 - 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM MWF

The newest smart phones, tablets, laptops, HD TVs, electrical vehicles, and many other devices emblematic of the modern world continue to increase the demand for raw mined materials and energy.  Further, the advances in standards of living in the developing world add many other stressors to the supply chains for raw materials and energy.  To meet these needs responsibly and sustainably is a growing challenge, particularly as society’s views about mining, fossil fuels, and other related issues continue to evolve. However, we must address these needs amid the growing concerns about global climate change, sustainability, and contentious geopolitical and economic issues. This class will explore the scientific, engineering, economic, public policy, social, and other key aspects of the multidimensional problems in ethical and integrated decision making required for providing critical materials and energy for today and the future.

 

The Road to Inequality

HONR 204A

Stefanie Hines

Percival Hall | Room 314A - 03:30 PM - 04:45 PM TTH

This course will examine the history of systemic racism concerning private land ownership and real property rights in the United States.  Beginning with the early settlers and the conflicts with Native Americans this course will examine policy, conflicts, bigotry, laws of descent, and other factors that created a massive divide in land ownership and equity. Throughout this course, students will use texts, articles, documentaries, and research to examine these different factors. This course will seek to engage students through understanding of United States property laws, human behavior, social justice, social inequities, political maneuvering, and the lasting impact on underrepresented populations in today’s world.  This course will require hands-on research in land ownership, laws of descent, use of historical records, and analysis of policy and data.  This course will require students to examine long-held truths about the American dream, housing, land rights, and racial discrimination in the United States of America.  Using a combination of reading material, visual material, and hands-on research students will analyze the past, present, and potential future state of social justice and real property.  Students will develop a research project and presentation.

 

Arthurdale, WV Matters

HONR 204B

Renee Nicholson, Ann Pancake, Michael Walsh

Oglebay Hall | Room 110 - 04:00 PM - 05:15 PM TTH

West Virginia has a rich, if complicated history and cultural identity, one that lives in historic places. By engaging thoughtfully with Arthurdale Heritage, the nation’s first New Deal homestead, students will be engaged in understanding its history, issues of Appalachia and rural America, and ways to help support and preserve it through a hands-on, civic and culturally focused public humanities course.

 

Dangerous Music

HONR 206A

Jennifer Walker

CPASS Building | Room 103 - 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM TTH

Music history is replete with moments when music has been considered dangerous, either as a seductive peril, as a threat to established cultural or social norms, or in even more sinister ways, such as its use as an instrument of punishment and torture in U.S. detention camps. This interdisciplinary class explores the various ways in which music and danger have become intertwined and, in some cases, inseparable. Drawing on studies in the fields of political science, religious history, gender studies, and sociology as well as music, and asking how danger has been and is perceived in terms of gender, sexuality, race, and politics, we will examine instances of “dangerous” music in diverse historical periods, musical styles, and global cultures. Please be aware, however, that this course is not designed to be comprehensive; exploring all major musical styles, trends, composers, performers, philosophies, and reception from antiquity to our modern era would be impossible in practice and counterproductive in conception. Instead, we will focus on select themes that will enable us to address overarching topics such as music and politics, music and religion, the impact of technology on music, and the historical positions and significant contributions of women, ethnic minorities, and other diverse musicians. Each thematic unit will conclude with the creation of a “micro-podcast.” At the end of the semester, the micro-podcasts will be compiled into a single, hour-long, collaborative work

 

Extractive Capitalism

HONR 207A

Devin Smart

Extractive Capitalism

Woodburn Hall | Room G11 - 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM – TTH

The class helps students understand the historical processes that created our current environmental crises. Specifically, it investigates the changing relationship between the economy and the natural world since the start of the Industrial Revolution, with a focus on extractive industries. The geographical framework of the course is both global and local. Students will learn about the interconnectedness of economies and ecologies across borders, continents and oceans, but they will also leave this class with a better appreciation of how Appalachia fits into the wider world. The history of extractive economies is as relevant to Appalachia as anywhere else, and it will serve as one of our key case studies, alongside and in dialogue with other parts of the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The course is organized around the history of fossil fuels, and the industrial societies they have created, beginning with coal and then the transition to petroleum. Along the way, we will also examine other extractive industries, including timber and commercial fishing, and will consider how they have changed local and global ecologies. The last section of the class zeros in on climate change, especially during the recent era of globalization. This concluding part of the class links past, present and future. Students will learn how different governments, companies and activists have responded to climate change and other consequences of extractive industries, and they will develop their own ideas about what the future could and should be.

 

City-As-Text-Morgantown

HONR 210

Kevin Gooding

Honors Hall | Room 120 | 11:30am - 12:45pm TTH

National Collegiate Honors Council's framework City-As-Text uses Morgantown as the basis for an interactive course which uses primary document and physical structures to investigate the historical, political, cultural and social aspects of place. The central question that the course seeks to answer is How does a Space become a Place?

 

Future Campus Reads

HONR 219

Susan Lantz

Woodburn Hall | Room G10 | 04:00pm - 04:50pm TH

Students in this course will read the five books chosen for the Campus Read Short List. Then, through analysis and discussion, students will make written recommendations to the Provost regarding the benefits and challenges of selecting each book for the Campus Read.

 

Service in Tutoring

HONR 245

Landon Southerly

Armstrong Hall | Room 422 | 04:00pm - 05:15pm T

Students must be available for the class meeting time PLUS up to 3 hours per week outside of class time for tutoring with Upward Bound. The tutoring hours help satisfy the service-learning component of this course and are required.

 

SPTP: Exploring Star Wars

HONR 293H

John Cole

Honors Hall | Room 120 | 02:30pm - 03:45pm TTH

What can a work of science fiction set “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” tell us about our own society here and now?  Since its cinematic premiere in 1977, Star Wars (an umbrella term referring to the entire franchise) has captivated the imagination and inspired enthusiasm around the world.  By any financial metric, Star Wars has been incredibly successful.  Perhaps even more important than its financial success, however, is the impact that Star Wars has had on culture and society.  From iconic music (Darth Vader's theme) to the creation of a new religion (Jediism), and from philosophical dilemmas (do droids have rights?) to its mythological roots (Joseph Campbell's heroic journey), Star Wars resonates strongly with diverse audiences for a variety of reasons.  This course explores some of these impacts and uses the Star Wars franchise as an interdisciplinary mirror to examine our culture and society.

 

SPTP: The U.S. Constitution

HONR 293Q

Anne Marie Lofaso

06:00pm - 06:50pm T

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

 

SPTP: Zombie Studies

HONR 293S

Dennis Allen

Woodburn Hall | Room 105 | 04:00pm - 04:50pm W

The zombie first appears in American popular culture in the 1930s and starts to become a cultural icon with the release of George Romero’s film Night of the Living Dead (1968) and the film’s sequels in the 1970’s and 80’s. It is in the 21st century, however, that the zombie becomes our preferred figure of alterity, the monster we love the most. Because a culture’s choice of an Other reflects its deepest concerns and anxieties, this course will attempt to answer two basic questions: why zombies? And why now? Readings for the course will consist of selected essays that discuss zombies in the context of deeper cultural concerns, ranging from pandemics (obviously) to ecological devastation to the alienation and existential crises seemingly inherent in modern life. Student projects will be based on the application of concepts from the readings to the zombie text (film, tv series, graphic novel, etc.) of their choice.   

 

SPTP: Business & Human Rights

HONR 293V

Jena Martin

Allen Hall | Room 511 | 05:00pm - 05:50pm M

Like it or not, businesses have an increasing impact – not just on our economy, but on society as a whole. Combine this with the incredible amount of power they yield (for instance, if Walmart was a country it would the 24th largest in the world) and you have a potentially potent mix.  This book seminar will serve as a deep dive into corporations’ larger societal impacts – particularly in the area of human rights.  We will read stories of people who work on the inside, people who tried to make change from the outside, and hear from the people whose lives have been directly affected by businesses.  Among the questions this seminar will explore include: what does it mean to be a corporate idealist? Can a business do well and also do good? How do you craft a framework that allows business to strive while still keeping communities in mind?

 

 

 

 

SPTP: Atlas Shrugged & Reality

HONR 293W

David Hauser & Alice Foley

Woodburn Hall | Room 306E | 06:30pm - 07:45pm T

Atlas Shrugged & Reality is a one-credit book study course where we will read Ayn Rand's magnum Opus, Atlas Shrugged, and then a more modern book that chronicles the attempt by libertarians to establish something like the community described in Atlas Shrugged.  While the political philosophy of libertarianism has been defined by numerous writers and scholars across many years, Ayn Rand remains the most popular and widely known author who promoted the philosophy.  This course will give students a chance to engage with her ideas, both in theoretical and practical applications.

 

SPTP: Applied Improvisation

HONR 293Y

Matthew Tolliver

Woodburn Hall | Room 105 | 05:00pm - 07:20pm W

Based on the foundational “Yes, and...” principle of improvisation, this course is designed to help participants develop their ability to respond to unexpected situations in clear, impactful, engaging, and less anxiety-provoking ways. Through participatory exercises and group activities, students will explore tools and skills in improvisation through team building, active listening, playfulness, creativity, and leadership development. Additionally, students will learn how improvisation has been applied in various disciplines like business, legal, science, education, government, healthcare, and non-profit sectors.

 

SPTP: Our Race Issue-Two Views

HONR 293Z

Kenneth Blemings

Honors Hall | 05:00pm - 05:50pm T

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

 

Research

HONR 297

Damien Clement

Online Course

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 106 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm M

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 109 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm T

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 109 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm W

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 109 | 04:20pm - 05:20pm TH

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room G10 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm T

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 110 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm T

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 106 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm M

 

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 106 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm W

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 109 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm W

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room 110 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm TH

 

 

 

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Woodburn Hall | Room G11 | 04:30pm - 05:20pm T

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Allen Hall | Room 610 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm TH

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Agricultural Sciences Building | Room 1007 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm M

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

CPASS Building | Room 116 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm T

 

Research

HONR 297

Paige Zalman

Allen Hall | Room 712 | 05:30pm - 06:20pm W

 

Advanced Peer Tutoring

HONR 301

Ashley Watts

Online Course

Students must be members of the Honors College in good academic standing and have completed HONR 201. (May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.) This course is designed as a forum for the exchange of ideas and an environment where advanced peer tutors can learn and discuss effective strategies for helping their University peers study various subjects.

 

The Salem Witch Trials

HONR 412

Kevin Gooding

Honors Hall | Room 120 | 09:30am - 10:45am TTH

The Salem Witch Trials are one of the iconic events of American History. This class examines the trials themselves and their interpretations in scholarly works, art, drama and film, poetry and other media.

 

 

EXCEL: Project Development

HONR 450 (Sections H01, H02, H03, H04, H05, H06, H07, & H08)

Dana Huebert-Lima

This course will enable and enhance experiential learning for students in the Honors EXCEL program. Students will develop skills in leadership, project management, communication and collaborative scholarship.

 

EXCEL: Summative Experience

HONR 451

Kristen Matak

Allen Hall | Room 808 | 02:00pm - 02:50pm WTH

This course is designed to enable and enhance experiential learning for students in the Honors EXCEL program. Students will develop written and oral communication skills. Students will present their work to stakeholders on- and/or off-campus.

 

Teaching Practicum

HONR 490 (Sections H01, H02, & H03)

Ashley Watts & Eric Murphy

Students must have completed HONR 402

 

Teaching Practicum

HONR 490

Cinthia Mara De Fonseca Pacheco & Carina Ferguson

Online course

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

 

Teaching Practicum

HONR 490

Damien Clement

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

 

Professional Field Experience

HONR 491

Damien Clement

This section is for internships. Please contact to Honors office for more information.

 

Independent Study

HONR 495

Dana Huebert-Lima

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

 

 

 

 

Independent Study

HONR 495

Damien Clement

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

 

Senior Thesis

HONR 496

Damien Clement

Online Course

 

Research

HONR 497

Damien Clement

Online Course

 

Professional Field Experience

HTOR 491

Francis DeMarco

PR: Consent (may be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours). Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

 

Introduction to Nutrition

HN&F 171

Kelli George

South Agricultural Sciences | Room 1021 | 02:00pm - 03:15pm TTH

Nutrient structure, metabolism, integrated function and their importance to human well-being during all stages of the life cycle. Current concerns and those of special interest to college students in meeting nutrient needs.

 

Nutrition/Activity/Health

HN&F 200

Annette Freshour & Ali Abbas

Agricultural Sciences Building | Room 2004 | 08:00am - 09:15am TTH

 

Principles of Immunobiology

IMMB 302

John Barnett

Health Sciences North | Room 2116 | 11:00am - 11:50am MWF

PR: IMMB 200 with a minimum grade of C-. Study of the basic concepts underlying the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity.

 

 

Microbial Genetics

IMMB 410

Mariette Barbier

Health Sciences North | Room 3129 | 08:30am - 09:50am TTH

PR: IMMB 301 with a minimum grade of C-. Molecular aspects of mutation, gene transfer mechanisms, genetic mapping, and genetic control using bactaria and bacteriophage systems as models.

 

Molecular Immunobiology

IMMB 420

Gordon Meares

Health Sciences Addition | Room G14 | 09:00am - 09:50am MWF

PR: IMMB 320 with a minimum grade of C-and PR or CONC: IMMB 420L. Study of the structure and function of the families of molecules employed by the immune system to recognize and initiate the immune response and the signaling pathways within the cell involved in the immune system.

 

Intro: LandArch/EnvDes/Planning

LARC 105

Michael Hasenmyer

CPASS Building | Room 104 | 11:00am - 11:50am MWF

A general overview of the field of landscape architecture, environmental design and planning. The course reviews the practices of design and planning professionals and their connections to society. An emphasis is placed on past development traditions and current sustainable development methods, strategies, and impacts of planning and design through the review of past and current projects.

 

Calculus 1

MATH 155

Iwona Wojciechowska

Armstrong Hall | Room 112 | 09:50am - 11:00am MWF

****This section is restricted. To apply for admittance, make a request here: https://math.wvu.edu/scheduling***

 

Calculus 2

MATH 156

Douglas Squire & Iwona Wojciechowska

Armstrong Hall | Room 119 | 09:50am - 11:00am MWF

****This section is restricted. To apply for admittance, make a request here: https://math.wvu.edu/scheduling Only first time freshman may apply.****

 

 

 

 

Multivariable Calculus

MATH 251

Renee LaRue

Armstrong Hall | Room 123 | 09:50am - 11:00am MWF

****This section is restricted. To apply for admittance, make a request here: https://math.wvu.edu/scheduling***

 

Elementary Differential Equations

MATH 261

Harvey Diamond

Oglebay Hall | Room 118 | 11:10am - 12:20pm MWF

"****This section is restricted. To apply for admittance, make a request here: https://math.wvu.edu/scheduling*** "

 

Mechatronics

MAE 221

Guilherme Augusto Silva Pereira

Mineral Resources Building | Room 113 | 11:00am - 12:15pm TTH

PR: ENGR 102 or CHE 102 or MAE 102. Selection of mechanical and electronic components and integration of these components into complex systems. Hands-on laboratory and design experiments with components and measurement equipment used in the design of mechatronic products. (2 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.)

 

Intro to Aerospace Engineering

MAE 215

Christopher Griffin

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G39 | 12:00pm - 12:50pm MWF

PR: (ENGR 102 or CHE 102 or MAE 102) and (MATH 154 or MATH 155 with grade of C- or higher). Fundamental physical quantities of a flowing gas, standard atmosphere, basic aerodynamic equations, airfoil nomenclature, lift, drag and aircraft performance. Digital computer usage applied to aerodynamic and performance problems and aircraft design. (3 hr. lec.)

 

Analysis-Engineering Systems

MAE 316

David Mebane

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G102 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

PR: MATH 261 with a grade of C- or better, (ENGR 102 or CHE 102 or MAE 102), and MAE 242. Analytical, numerical, and computational techniques to analyze and solve engineering problems. Mathematical modeling, solution strategies, and analysis of results. Statistical techniques including probability distribution functions, regression analysis, and curve fitting.

 

 

 

Heat Transfer

MAE 423

Derek Johnson

Engineering Sciences Building | Room G39 | 11:00am - 12:15pm TTH

PR: WVU sections require MATH 261 with a grade of C- or better and MAE 320 and (MAE 331 or MAE 335), WVUIT sections require MAE 331 and MAE 321 as prerequisites and MAE 419 concurrently. One-, two-, three-dimensional steady state conduction: transient conduction; free and forced convection; radiation; heat exchangers; heat and mass transfer by analytical, numerical analogical and experimental methods; design of thermal systems.

 

Media Writing

JRL 215

John Temple, Richard Bebout, & Ashton Marra

Evansdale Crossing | Room 429 | 09:30am - 10:45am MW

PR: College of Media major or minor. Introduction to the fundamental reporting and storytelling skills that are the foundation of all media writing: print, radio, television, public relations, advertising and social media.

 

Media Ethics and Law

JRL 328

Joel Beeson, Richard Bebout, Lucinda Hart, Chad Mezera, & Andrew Pickens

Online Course

PR: JRL 215 or MDIA 215 with a minimum grade of C-. An in-depth exploration of the complex ethical and legal media landscape, with an emphasis on key historical precedents, new cases and challenges related to emerging technology, digital disinformation, artificial intelligence, new problems in social media and other current issues in journalism, public relations and advertising.

 

Music in Appalachia

MUSC 118

Travis Stimeling

Online Course

Survey of traditional instrumental and vocal music of southern Appalachia. History, style characteristics, and performance techniques involving live and recorded examples emphasizing those found in West Virginia.

 

Professional Field Experience

NAS 491

Bonnie Brown

PR: Consent. Supervised interdisciplinary experiences focused on Native Americans. May be tribally based or related to agencies and projects serving Native Americans. This course is not open to freshman.

 

 

 

HNRS: NSG 100 Add-On

NSG 298A

Roger Carpenter & Susan McKenrick

Online Course

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

HNRS: NSG 100 Add-On

NSG 298B

Roger Carpenter & Amy Sparks

Online Course

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

HNRS: NSG 100 Add-On

NSG 298C

Roger Carpenter & Amanda Edwards

Online Course

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

HNRS: NSG 100 Add-On

NSG 298D

Roger Carpenter

Online Course

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

HNRS: NSG 100 Add-On

NSG 298E

Roger Carpenter

Online Course

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Independent Study

NSG 495

Roger Carpenter

Online Course

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

 

Research

NSG 497

Roger Carpenter

Introduction to Pathology

PALM 300

Michelle Butina, Michelle Costas, Justin Falcon, & Kimberly Feaster

Online Course

A laptop is required for this course since all exams will be administered through SOLE.

 

History of Ancient Philosophy

PHIL 244

David Hoinski

Armstrong Hall | Room 119 | 03:30pm - 04:20pm MWF

PR: 3 hours in philosophy. An introduction to the philosophies of the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, and the Stoics.

 

Intro to Symbolic Logic

PHIL 260

Geoff Gerogi

Oglebay Hall | Room 103 | 01:30pm - 02:20pm MWF

An introduction to modern symbolic logic (basically, propositional logic and the predicate calculus) for students who want to acquire the skill to represent symbolically the form of deductive arguments and to test formally for validity.

 

Metaphysics

PHIL 301

Geoff Georgi

Armstrong Hall | Room 119 | 11:30am - 12:20pm MWF

PR: 3 hours of philosophy. Traditional problems associated with reality and experience, universals and particulars, causality, space and time, matter and mind, and the nature of the self.

 

Health Care Ethics

PHIL 331

Daniel Miller

Armstrong Hall | Room 119 | 04:00pm - 05:15pm TTH

PR: 3 hours philosophy or pre-med or health sciences student. Topics: Clinician- patient relationship, life-sustaining treatment, physician assisted death, physician-nurse conflicts, confidentiality, research, reproductive technology, abortion, maternal/fetal conflicts, genetics, rationing, and access.

 

Intro - Health/Well-being Prof

PE 110

Online Course | 02:00pm - 02:50pm TH

This course will provide prospective healthcare professionals introductory information and early experiences related to careers in healthcare. Topics include career exploration and career planning, professional standards, and fundamental knowledge necessary for careers in the health and well-being industry.

 

Enhancing Health & Well-being

PE 224

Erin Jordan

Mineral Resources Building | Room 205 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

Gain knowledge and explore links among the eight dimensions of wellness: physical, mental, social, spiritual, intellectual, environmental, occupational, and financial.

 

General Physics

PHYS 112

John Stewart

White Hall | Room G09 | 09:30am - 10:20am MWF, 07:00pm - 09:00pm T (09/14, 10/05, 11/02, 11/30)

 

General Physics

PHYS 112

John Stewart

White Hall | Room 102 | 02:30pm - 05:20pm W

 

Intro American Government

POLS 102

Eric Myers

Woodburn Hall | Room 101 | 08:30am - 09:20am MWF

General survey of American national government and politics.

 

Global Political Issues

POLS 103

Woodburn Hall | Room 105 | 01:00pm - 02:15pm TTH

Analysis of issues in post-cold war international politics, ranging from traditional major power diplomacy and intervention to the newer problems of economic interdependence and development, human rights, population pressures on limited resources, and the environment.

 

Concepts in Political Theory

POLS 270

Philip Michelbach

Oglebay Hall | Room 110 | 07:00pm - 08:15pm MW

Introduction to political theory using texts from antiquity through modernity. Themes include citizenship, power, justice, and political obligation.

 

 

 

 

HNRS: PSYC 101 Add-On

PSYC 298B

Elizabeth Levelle

Life Sciences Building | Room 1111 | 02:30pm - 03:20pm T

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

 

Independent Study

PSYC 495

Shari Haxel

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regularly scheduled courses.

 

Intro to Public/Community Hlth

PUBH 101

Michael McCawley

Health Sciences North | Room G119A | 09:30am - 10:50am TTH

This course will provide students with an overview of the principles and practice of public and community health. Students will learn about the history, core function and essential services of public health, as well as engage in discussions about current public health events and issues.

 

Global Perspective Public Hlth

PUBH 201

David Woodrum

Health Sciences North | Room G119B | 09:30am - 10:50am MW

This introduction to global public health will strengthen students' perspectives and understanding of disease prevention and treatment issues in westernized and developing/underdeveloped countries. Topics include health disparities, economic/political structures/systems impacting health, maternal and child health (including family planning), socio-cultural factors affecting health care delivery and the global burden of infectious and chronic diseases, injuries and disasters.

 

Intro to Health Administration

PUBH 230

Erik Carlton & Sarah Woodrum

Health Sciences South | Room 8606 | 02:30pm - 03:50pm TTH

Introduces core concepts in health administration, addressing the organization of health services, administrative theories and applications, performance improvement, decision-making, managing change, and professionalism/communication in healthcare and public health administration.

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction-World Religions

RELG 102

Alyssa Beall

Oglebay Hall | Room 110 | 01:00pm - 02:15pm TTH

This course explores five of the most widely practiced world religions; Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Students are introduced to the history and basic tenets of each faith.

 

Human Diversity

SOWK 147

Ming Hsieh Hall | Room 122 | 06:00pm - 08:50pm M

(Must be completed before applying to the major.) Covers a range of diverse populations especially those historically subjected to oppression and social and economic injustice. Addresses the causes and effects of institutionalized forms of oppression.

 

Introduction to Social Work

SOWK 151

Carol Amendola & Katrina Snyder

Eiesland Hall | Room 503 | 02:30pm - 03:45pm TTH

PR: Consent. (Must be completed before applying to the major.) Overview of the social welfare field and social work profession. Emphasizes social work values and ethics.

 

Social Problems-Contmp America

SOCA 207

Daniel Brewster

Clark Hall | Room 112 | 11:30am - 12:20pm MWF

Sociological analysis of the causes, effects and approaches to preventing and reducing social problems in American society.

 

Intermediate Spanish 1

SPAN 203

William Morgan

Hodges Hall | Room 133 | 11:30am - 12:45pm TTH

PR: SPAN 102 or score of S3 on placement exam. Continuation of Span 102.

 

SPED in Contemporary Society

SPED 304

Ann Richards

Online Course

Special eduction principles and practices, interactions between disability and diversity in identification and intervention, and influences of family, professional, school and community infrastructures on educational programs/ outcomes for children and adults. (Equivalent of DISB 304).

 

Intro to Sport Management

SM 167

Gary Lhotsky

CPASS Building | Room G06 | 10:00am - 10:50am MWF

 

Psychological Perspectivs-Sprt

SEP 272

Scott Barnicle

CPASS Building | Room G08 | 10:00am - 10:50am MWF

 

Psychological Perspectivs-Sprt

SEP 272

CPASS Building | Room G06 | 11:00am - 11:15pm TTH

An examination of personality and behavioral factors as they affect participation in sport. Topics such as stress and sport, body image, aggression and the sport participant, and the licensure of sport psychologists highlight the course.

 

Sport Studies Research Methods

SEP 474

Johannes Raabe

CPASS Building | Room 101 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

 

World Theatre & Drama

THET 170

Radhica Ganapathy

CPASS Building | Room G06 | 01:00pm - 01:50pm MWF

Introduction to theatre and drama traditions in ten world cultures. An intercultural study of theaters, performance and staging practices, the cultural milieu, and dramatic literature.

 

Knowing Learning Math and Sci

UTCH 221

Matthew Campbell

Allen Hall | Room 808 | 09:30am - 10:45am TTH

PR: ARSC 120 and PR or CONC: ARSC 220. This class focuses on how students come to know and learn in secondary mathematics and science as understood from multidisciplinary perspectives. Students will identify, learn, and employ learning theories that will guide their own pedagogical practice as thoughtful and reflective practitioners.

 

Classroom Interaction Math Sci

UTCH 222

Joshua Karr & Vanessa Licwov-Channell

Allen Hall | Room 612 | 08:00am - 09:15am TTH

PR: UTCH 221 with a minimum grade of C-. The course examines: interplay between teachers/students/content, instructional strategies for teaching math and science, equity issues in learning, technology in the classroom, analyzing and applying research findings in the classroom, and the use of documentation in the teaching profession.

 

Effective Public Speaking

WVUE 270

Carolyn Atkins

Online Course

Students must register for both the lecture and a laboratory. Laboratory sections are numbered 002-021.

 

PresStudAbm: Leading & Serving

WVUE 280

Carolyn Atkins

Evansdale Crossing | Room 412 | 12:30pm - 01:45pm TTH

PR: Consent. In addition to developing and presenting four major public speaking assignments, students fulfill Student Engagement & Leadership requirements of 20 leadership events and 40 service hours to become Certified Student Leaders.

 

PresStudAbm: Speakers Bureau

WVUE 281

Carolyn Atkins

Online Course

PR: WVUE 280 with a minimum grade of B-. Students who have completed WVUe 280 (Presidential Student Ambassadors: Leading & Serving) will enroll in Speakers Bureau the following semester. They will speak to eight external audiences (e.g., prospective and current WVU students and/or their families, WVU/State audiences, etc.) about university-related topics. The professor will assign four events; students will be responsible for scheduling additional audiences, pre-approved by the Professor.

 

Intro-Womens/Gender Studies

WGST 170

Kristiina Riivald

Armstrong Hall | Room 422 | 05:30pm - 06:45pm MW

The major contexts in which gender identities have been and are defined and of the relationships between these definitions and the roles and history of women and men in society and culture.

 

 

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